India richer by 349 new species

The flower Impatiens paramjitiana. Photo: BSI/ZSI

June 11, 2015, www.thehindu.com | “The list of new discoveries by the Botanical Survey of India (BSI) and the Zoological Survey of India (ZSI), both headquartered here, were released on the World Environment Day on June 5.  ‘Of the new plants, some of the significant findings include nine new taxa of wild Musa (bananas), four species of black plum (jamun), three species of wild gingibers and 10 species of orchids,’ BSI director Paramjit Singh told The Hindu.”

Kannan Ambalam shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
At a time when plants and animals are under threat across the world, nature lovers and conservationists in India have 349 reasons to feel happy. Scientists and taxonomists of the country have discovered 349 new species
thehindu.com|By Shiv Sahay Singh
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King of the jungle returns to Gabon after nearly 20 year absence

Male lion in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Most of the world's lions are now found in southern and eastern Africa. Photo by: Rhett A. Butler.

March 16, 2015, news.mongabay.com | “‘The return of lions to the Batéké marks a significant step in the work of [the Aspinall Foundation] to do everything humanly possible to encourage endangered species to return to the ancestral homelands which are their rightful place,’ said Damian Aspinall, Chairman of The Aspinall Foundation, which has been working in Batéké Plateau National Park for years, focusing especially on western lowland gorillas.”

  GoodNews FortheEarth

Since 1996, conservationists have proof that a healthy male lion has returned to the Central African country of Gabon.

  • Dawn Shitstorm Ti, Regina Siegel, Allan Schwarz, Katie Rose RainbowMaker, Ricky Van Heart, Mariette Low, Dermot Rush, Alice Alford, Rita Cooper, Kate Sinks, Kate Dow, Juliann Adiastri Rubijono, Rita Kerzen, Anita A Garrod, Nancy Brophy, Diana Hartel, Merle Hayward, Marcela Marozzini, Judith Green
  • COMMENTS:
  •  Gail Lucas – “Wonderful news.”

 

In Alaska, a wood bison is born in the wild, the first in a century

Alaska

April 30, 2015, www.latimes.com | “It’s a baby wood bison! The wood bison calf — part of a herd reintroduced into the wild in Alaska — was born last week, the first new critter of its type to draw breath in the wild in more than 100 years.”

Robert Brothers shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
A herd had been in captivity at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center south of Anchorage for a dozen years and had continued to multiply. About 100 were…
latimes.com|By Los Angeles Times

Scientists make one of the biggest animal discoveries of the century: a new tapir

Painting of the new tapir species. Painting courtesy of Fabrício R. Santos.

December 16, 2013, news.mongabay.com | “In what will likely be considered one of the biggest (literally) zoological discoveries of the Twenty-First Century, scientists today announced they have discovered a new species of tapir in Brazil and Colombia. The new mammal, hidden from science but known to local indigenous tribes, is actually one of the biggest animals on the continent, although it’s still the smallest living tapir. Described in the Journal of Mammalogy, the scientists have named the new tapir Tapirus kabomani after the name for “tapir” in the local Paumari language: “Arabo kabomani.””

 

Scientists make one of the biggest animal discoveries of the century: a new tapir
news.mongabay.com
In what will likely be considered one of the biggest (literally) zoological discoveries of the Twenty-First Century, scientists today announced they have discovered a new species of tapir in Brazil and Colombia. The new mammal, hidden from science but known to local indigenous tribes, is actually on…
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Oysters Come Back After Humans Ate So Many They Disappeared

Oysters Come Back After Humans Ate So Many They Disappeared

November 23, 2013, www.care2.com | “It only took one century for “ravenous San Franciscans” to catch and devour so many oysters that they disappeared from the waters where they had lived for millennia. In 1893, Olympia oyster beds covered 8,033 acres — about a half-million per acre — in Newport Bay, Elkhorn Slough, San Francisco Bay and Humboldt Bay but by 1911, all the region’s native oyster beds had disappeared.”

Over the past year, two million oysters have settled on human-made reefs composed of mesh bags filled with discarded shells from Drakes Bay Oyster Co.
Oysters Brought Back to San Francisco Bay — 100 years after the last oyster from the Bay was eaten
www.care2.com
Thanks to the good work of conservationists, oysters are coming back to the San Francisco Bay.
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Locally extinct birds in the Amazon slowly flock back to forests when trees regrow

A researcher holds an Amazonian Royal Flycatcher caught during the study. Credit: Luke L. Powell.

November 14, 2013, news.mongabay.com | “Some good news out of the Amazon rainforest: given enough time, deforested land can rebound enough to host bird species that had previously deserted the area, according to a recent study in The Auk. Between 1992 and 2011, a team led by Philip Stouffer of Louisiana State University tracked the movements of birds through fragmented rainforest in the Brazilian Amazon. Using soft nylon stretches called mist nets, they snagged nearly 4,000 birds at the margins between old growth forests and tracts of between old growth rainforest and forest recovering after being abandoned by cattle ranchers. ”

GoodNews FortheEarth shared a link.

Locally extinct birds in the Amazon slowly flock back to forests when trees regrow
news.mongabay.com
Some good news out of the Amazon rainforest: given enough time, deforested land can rebound enough to host bird species that had previously deserted the area, according to a recent study in <i>The Auk</i>. When people abandon deforested land, the rainforest slowly reclaims it. Eventually, birds be…..
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Long-gone Swainson’s hawk returns to Bay Area

Swainson

September 30, 2013, www.mercurynews.com | “A Swainson’s hawk chick has hatched under the eye of Santa Clara County bird-watchers for the first time since the 1800s, suggesting that this elegant bird, a threatened species in California, may be on the road to recovery.”

murcurynews.com
www.murcurynews.com
murcurynews.com

Center for Biological Diversity 2012 Annual Report

Photo: The Center's 2012 Annual Report is right here: http://www.biologicaldiversity.org/publications/reports/AnnualRpt2012_small.pdf You should check it out.

June 27, 2013, www.biologicaldiversity.org | “This was a record-breaking year for protecting endangered species. The Center for Biological Diversity won positive Endangered Species Act decisions for 104 animals and plants, as well as final protection for 33 species, including two Arctic ice seals, Puerto Rico’s coquí llanero tree frog, eight southeastern mussels, 23 Hawaiian plants and insects and a San Francisco manzanita once believed to have vanished forever from the wild. We also secured 40 million acres of protected habitat for wildlife — an area larger than Pennsylvania.”

2012 ANNUAL – CENTER FOR BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY
Lots of successes here, with solid plans for more.
The Center’s 2012 Annual Report is right here

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The scarlet macaw returns to Mexico after 70 years

Scarlet macaw in flight.  Photo by Raul Miranda.

June 11, 2013, news.mongabay.com | “On April 21, 2013, the first flock of scarlet macaws (of many more to come) was released into the jungles of Aluxes Ecopark, nearby classified World Heritage Site Palenque National Park, as a part of a massive reintroduction project to restore the popular and culturally-significant bird to the well preserved rainforests of Palenque and the rest of its southern Mexico homeland—where the species has been extinct for close to 70 years.”

“Flying rainbows: the scarlet macaw returns to Mexico
news.mongabay.com
On April 21, 2013, the first flock of scarlet macaws (of many more to come) was released into the jungles of Aluxes Ecopark, nearby classified World Heritage Site Palenque National Park, as a part of a massive reintroduction project to restore the popular and culturally-significant bird to the well…”
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Group kicks off planting of ancient tree clones

April 22, 2013, news.yahoo.com | “A team led by a nurseryman from northern Michigan and his sons has raced against time for two decades, snipping branches from some of the world’s biggest and most durable trees with plans to produce clones that could restore ancient forests and help fight climate change.  Now comes the most ambitious phase of the quest: getting the new trees into the ground.”

Happy Earth Day 2013
Group kicks off planting of ancient tree clones
news.yahoo.com
COPEMISH, Mich. (AP) — After spending two decades producing clones from some of the world’s biggest and oldest trees, a nonprofit group says it’s time to start planting.
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