Japan Flocks To Solar Homes In Fukushima Fallout

March 16, 2012, www.care2.com | March 11th marked the one year anniversary of the tragic earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan, and triggered a catastrophic meltdown at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant.

As Japan tries to pick up the pieces from that disaster, its government has made very definite decisions to shift the country away from a reliance on nuclear power, and citizens have followed suit.

Instead of slapping together housing as quickly as during the weeks of power shortages that followed, Japanese developers chose to focus on building styles that would help the country remain operational should a similar disaster occur again. Several development companies began work on “green” apartments equipped with solar panels, and the buildings are already selling out.

 

Japan Flocks To Solar Homes In Fukushima Fallout
www.care2.com
As Japan’s government has made very definite decisions to shift the country away from a reliance on nuclear power, its citizens have followed suit.

Comments:

    • John SaundersThis is the start when them Japanese start thinking sustainable then developments will happen.

    • Janie HarwoodIt’s amazing what a natural disaster can do to high risk pollutants – revolt of the government? Or revolt of the people. Or will there b a new twist to the saga. If we all got our natural energy sorted, America would have a problem in justifying any further wars

    • Janie Harwood I know their not justified but their power houses think their justified. They’ll b supporting the drug trade, will give the extra revenue they want.

Judge Nixes Tejon Pass Sprawl Development Project

Feb 13, 2012, www.biologicaldiversity.org | BAKERSFIELD, Calif.— Plans for a large scale housing development proposed in the Frazier Mountain area of  southern Kern County, Calif. were struck down by a superior court judge on Friday, Feb. 10, in a victory for groups fighting for smart growth in the region. The Frazier Park Estates project would have included 41 acres of houses and condominiums on steep and rugged terrain in the rural mountain area near Lebec and the Tejon Pass area of Interstate 5.

Judge Kenneth C. Twisselman of the Kern County Superior Court agreed with TriCounty Watchdogs and the Center for Biological Diversity that Kern County had failed to adequately analyze the project’s water supply; that the project description inconsistently described the project as having anywhere from 188 to 661 residences; and that the county improperly justified deferred mitigation for the project’s impacts. The suit was brought under the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA.

 

“This is an extremely important habitat area for scores of threatened, endangered, and rare species, including the California condor, so it’s important that any development be carefully thought out,” said Adam Keats, urban wildlands directo…
Judge Nixes Tejon Pass Sprawl Development Project
www.biologicaldiversity.org
BAKERSFIELD, Calif.— Plans for a large scale housing development proposed in the Frazier Mountain area of southern Kern County, Calif. were struck down by a superior court judge on Friday, Feb. 10, in a victory for groups fighting for smart growth in the region. The Frazier Park Estates proje…
  • GoodNews FortheEarth and Michael Sykes like this.

Bedouin Women Lighting Up the Desert as Barefoot Solar Engineers

April 4th 2011, www.thecuttingedgenews.com | “Two Jordanian Bedouin women have recently returned from a six-month course at a unique college in India where they were trained as solar engineers. The two women, who are illiterate and have never been employed, were carefully selected by the elders in the village to attend the course at Barefoot College in India which helps poor rural communities become more sustainable.”

Leila Bee shared a link.
“The Cutting Edge News
www.thecuttingedgenews.com
For many living in the harsh and desolate deserts of south Jordan, life without electricity is the norm. Either the infrastructure which provides electricity doesn’t reach them or they simply don’t have the money to afford it. However, all that looks set to change as two women bring to light the adv…”
  • GoodNews FortheEarth Leila Bee, and Emilianne Slaydon like this.
  • Comments:
    • GoodNews FortheEarth

      ‎”~ AN EXAMPLE OF ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL PROGRAMS ON THE PLANET: “Barefoot College launched the solar power course for women in 2005 and already more than 150 grandmothers from 28 countries have been trained. Over 10,000 homes in 100 villages have been solar electrified which has SAVED 1.5 MILLION LITERS OF KEROSENE FROM POLLUTING THE ATOMOSPHERE.”
      There are more examples of the work of the Barefoot College out there. If anyone finds some, please send them our way!”

B.C. First Nation unveils solar power project

Photo: If you do not like pipe lines and the dirty tar sands mess, I am thinking that there is a great lesson to be learned from the T'Sou-ke First Nation on the south tip of Vancouver Island.  The 40 home Reserve is now energy independent by making use of solar panel arrays.  Chief Gordon Plances and the entire Souk community should be commended.  They are not only energy indepependent but are also producing the hot water needed for residents. The 75 kilowats produced on the Reserve are sufficient to export electricity to the British Columbia power grid

July 17, 2009, www.cbc.ca | “A native community on Vancouver Island has become the largest solar energy producing community in B.C.  The T’Sou-ke First Nation has unveiled its solar power project that will see solar energy power the band office, fisheries building, canoe shed and 25 homes on the reserve. Nine band members have also been certified as solar panel installers.”

If you do not like pipe lines and the dirty tar sands mess, I am thinking that there is a great lesson to be learned from the T’Sou-ke First Nation on the south tip of Vancouver Island. The 40 home Reserve is now energy independent by making use of solar panel arrays. Chief Gordon Plances and the entire Souk community should be commended. They are not only energy indepependent but are also producing the hot water needed for residents. The 75 kilowats produced on the Reserve are sufficient to export electricity to the British Columbia power grid
  • Robert Brothers and Good Vibrations like this.
css.php