WWII Escape Tunnels Converted to World’s First Sustainable Underground Urban Farm

July 6, 2015, thefreethoughtproject.com | “In an amazing example of low-impact, high-yield farming, an underground urban farm has begun operation in London in old World War II tunnels beneath the city.  The Growing Underground is the world’s first underground urban garden. It is an eco-friendly, sustainable farming business, which uses LED and hydroponics to produce a wide assortment of vegetables and herbs.”

Kevin Phillips shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
100 Feet below one of the world’s largest cities lies vast expanses of eco-friendly LED lit gardens. The food never has to be trucked anywhere.
thefreethoughtproject.com
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Coal Is No Longer King in America, Says EIA Report

July 2, 2015, ecowatch.com | “Coal is no longer king in America. That’s the latest findings from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), which provides independent statistics and analysis of the energy sector. Coal lost its number one spot as the nation’s top electricity source for the first time on record this April.”

The stock prices of our three biggest coal companies have dropped over 95% since January of 2010. But our use of coal dropped less than 10% in the same period. So a giant drop in stock value was precipitated by a modest drop in business volume. However…
The key take-away is that stock price is determined by investors’ perception about the future of the company’s product, not by the present business performance.
The investors fled from the industry in droves because they didn’t see a future in it. —Kent Minault, activist, Beyond Coal
U.S. Energy Information Administration reports coal lost its number one spot as the nation’s top electricity source for the first time on record this April
ecowatch.com
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Abandoned mine given environmental algae makeover

June 25, 2015, positivenews.org.uk | “A scientific research project is using algae to extract biofuel and precious metals from toxic water in abandoned mines, while simultaneously restoring the ecological health of the area.  Scientists from Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter universities have joined forces on the project, known as the GW4 Alliance, and have begun experimenting with waste water from a deserted tin mine in Cornwall.”

Using algae to restore an old mining site and remove hazardous materials – naturally!
A new research project could help clean up old mining messes by turning waste water into a useful resource
positivenews.org.uk

10 States Leading the Clean Tech Revolution

June 22, 2015, ecowatch.com | “What’s the state of clean technology in America? Think renewable energy (wind, solar, hydro power, etc.), adoption of electric vehicles, green building and many other factors. As shown by this new nation-wide index, some states are rising above the pack compared to others.”

STATUS REPORT: “11 states now generate more than 10 percent of their electricity from non-hydro renewable energy sources, with three of these states—Iowa, South Dakota and Kansas—exceeding 20 percent.”
Clean Edge, a clean-tech research firm, has released their annual US Clean Tech Leadership Index, ranking all 50 states for their clean tech efforts.
ecowatch.com
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IBM Solar Collector Magnifies Sun By 2000X – These Could Provide Power To The Entire Planet

June 16, 2015, www.newearth.media | “A team at IBM recently developed what they call a High Concentration Photo Voltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of concentrating the power of 2,000 suns, they are even claiming to be able to concentrate energy safely up to 5,000X, that’s huge.”

Written by Arjun Walia A team at IBM recently developed what they call a High Concentration Photo Voltaic Thermal (HCPVT) system that is capable of…
newearth.media
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Environmental activism works, study shows

June 15, 2015, www.sciencedaily.com | “The environmental movement is making a difference — nudging greenhouse gas emissions down in states with strong green voices, according to a Michigan State University (MSU) study.  Social scientist Thomas Dietz and Kenneth Frank, MSU Foundation professor of sociometrics, have teamed up to find a way to tell if a state jumping on the environmental bandwagon can mitigate other human factors — population growth and economic affluence — known to hurt the environment.”

Thanks to Asha Stout for letting us know about this!
Next time you can post articles directly to our Timeline.
Note how we can change the headline and intro paragraph of each story to make them more clear and dramatic simply by clicking on them and changing the words, as I did below.
The environmental movement is making a difference — nudging greenhouse gas emissions down in states with strong green voices, according to a study. Scientists…
sciencedaily.com
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Bluescope unveils “world first” solar roof with heat and power

June 13, 2015, reneweconomy.com.au | “A small terrace house in the inner Sydney suburb of Glebe is hosting what is believed to be the world’s first building integrated solar system that generates electricity as well as heat. The array combines thin-film solar PV and solar thermal technologies into a steel sheet roofing product produced by Australian steel manufacturer Bluescope, with assistance from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.”

Bluescope unveils “world first” built-in solar array that generates electricity and heat, and acts as roofing.
reneweconomy.com.au
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This ancient Egyptian practice can cheaply purify dirty water

June 13, 2015, www.sciencealert.com | “The seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree have been used to purify water and clean crockery since the days of ancient Egypt, but up until now scientists weren’t sure exactly how they worked. Thanks to a new paper published in the journal Langmuir by researchers at Pennsylvania State University, part of the mystery has now been solved.”

Jin Maju

The seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree have been used to purify water and clean crockery since the days of ancient Egypt, but up until now scientists weren’t sure…
sciencealert.com|By ScienceAlert Staff

School goes green with solar panels and new programme

Forward thinking: Bure Park Primary School’s eco team, who have been working with Low Carbon Hub on the solar panel installation

June 11, 2015, www.oxfordmail.co.uk | “Hunderds of solar panels have been installed at a Bicester school in the biggest scheme of its kind at a primary in Oxfordshire.  Bure Park Primary School had 240 solar panels put in over the May half-term, enough to generate 53,200kWh a year and power more than 15 homes.  Pupils on the school’s eco team worked with social enterprise Low Carbon Hub to set up the scheme, which officially launched on Wednesday, June 3.”

Mariette Low shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
School goes green with solar panels and new programme
HUNDREDS of solar panels have been installed at a Bicester school in the biggest scheme of its kind at a primary in Oxfordshire.
oxfordmail.co.uk

The U.N. surprises everyone with a breakthrough deal to slow deforestation

June 11, 2015, grist.org | “A surprise deal emerged from U.N. climate negotiations in Bonn, Germany, this week: Diplomats managed to reach a key agreement to compensate developing nations that agree to preserve their forests. And environmental and civil society groups had generally nice things to say about the deal.”

It’s not often that happy, unexpected news emerges from climate negotiations, but that’s exactly what happened at a meeting in Germany this week.
grist.org
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