Bedouin Women Lighting Up the Desert as Barefoot Solar Engineers

April 4th 2011, www.thecuttingedgenews.com | “Two Jordanian Bedouin women have recently returned from a six-month course at a unique college in India where they were trained as solar engineers. The two women, who are illiterate and have never been employed, were carefully selected by the elders in the village to attend the course at Barefoot College in India which helps poor rural communities become more sustainable.”

Leila Bee shared a link.
“The Cutting Edge News
www.thecuttingedgenews.com
For many living in the harsh and desolate deserts of south Jordan, life without electricity is the norm. Either the infrastructure which provides electricity doesn’t reach them or they simply don’t have the money to afford it. However, all that looks set to change as two women bring to light the adv…”
  • GoodNews FortheEarth Leila Bee, and Emilianne Slaydon like this.
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    • GoodNews FortheEarth

      ‎”~ AN EXAMPLE OF ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL PROGRAMS ON THE PLANET: “Barefoot College launched the solar power course for women in 2005 and already more than 150 grandmothers from 28 countries have been trained. Over 10,000 homes in 100 villages have been solar electrified which has SAVED 1.5 MILLION LITERS OF KEROSENE FROM POLLUTING THE ATOMOSPHERE.”
      There are more examples of the work of the Barefoot College out there. If anyone finds some, please send them our way!”

B.C. First Nation unveils solar power project

Photo: If you do not like pipe lines and the dirty tar sands mess, I am thinking that there is a great lesson to be learned from the T'Sou-ke First Nation on the south tip of Vancouver Island.  The 40 home Reserve is now energy independent by making use of solar panel arrays.  Chief Gordon Plances and the entire Souk community should be commended.  They are not only energy indepependent but are also producing the hot water needed for residents. The 75 kilowats produced on the Reserve are sufficient to export electricity to the British Columbia power grid

July 17, 2009, www.cbc.ca | “A native community on Vancouver Island has become the largest solar energy producing community in B.C.  The T’Sou-ke First Nation has unveiled its solar power project that will see solar energy power the band office, fisheries building, canoe shed and 25 homes on the reserve. Nine band members have also been certified as solar panel installers.”

If you do not like pipe lines and the dirty tar sands mess, I am thinking that there is a great lesson to be learned from the T’Sou-ke First Nation on the south tip of Vancouver Island. The 40 home Reserve is now energy independent by making use of solar panel arrays. Chief Gordon Plances and the entire Souk community should be commended. They are not only energy indepependent but are also producing the hot water needed for residents. The 75 kilowats produced on the Reserve are sufficient to export electricity to the British Columbia power grid
  • Robert Brothers and Good Vibrations like this.
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