Additional articles

Indigenous Ecuadorians March Against Canadian Copper Mine
QUITO, Ecuador, March 8, 2012 (ENS) – Several hundred members of the largest Ecuadorian indigenous organization today began marching to the capital, Quito, to protest new mining in their territory. They expect to arrive in Quito on March 22. The indigenous march started from Yantzaza in Zamora Chinchipe province southern Ecuador, where …

An Ancient Native American Drought Solution For A Parched California

June 2, 2015, kvpr.org | “In the Sierra Nevada, above Fresno, North Fork Mono Indians are working to thin the forest. The group’s goal is twofold. Save water and prevent large-scale forest fires. North Fork Mono Indians have been using this approach for centuries, but now California’s severe drought means these ancient techniques are being looked at as a possible long-term solution. From Valley Public Radio, Ezra David Romero reports.”

excellent model for drought solution
In the Sierra Nevada, above Fresno, North Fork Mono Indians are working to thin the forest. The group’s goal is twofold. Save water and prevent large-scale
kvpr.org|By Ezra David Romero
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Northwest tribes are a growing obstacle to energy development

May 28, 2015, www.hcn.org | “On May 13, a tribe in Northern British Columbia turned down a Malaysian energy company’s offer of nearly $260,000 (CAN $319,000) for each member as compensation for building a natural gas export terminal on ancestral lands. The Lax Kw’alaam First Nation said no to the $1.15 billion package after the community unanimously voted against the terminal last week over the risk to local salmon habitat.”

Lax Kw’alaam First Nation said no to the $1.15 billion package after the community unanimously voted against the terminal last week over the risk to local salmon habitat.
B.C. tribal members turned down $260K each in order to stop a gas terminal.
hcn.org

    Nancy BrophyMike H AngelMaryska Azzena

Grassy Narrows 12-year blockade against clear cutting wins award

 

May 24, 2015, www.cbc.ca | “An Ontario environmental group is recognizing one of Canada’s longest standing blockades with a public service award.  Grassy Narrows First Nation in northwestern Ontario received Ontario Nature’s J.R. Dymond Public Service Award for exceptional environmental achievement at a ceremony on Saturday.”

Absolutely Awesome!
An Ontario environmental group is recognizing one of Canada’s longest standing blockades with a public service award.
cbc.ca
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This amazing village in India plants 111 trees every time a girl is born

May 21, 2015, www.globalcitizen.org | “In a country that historically favors the birth of a son, Piplantri village in India has created a new tradition that not only celebrates the birth of a daughter, but also benefits the community and the planet. You see, every time a girl is born they plant 111 trees. That’s right, 111 trees!”

Pamela Benda shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
A tradition that celebrates girls and benefits the community and planet.
globalcitizen.org
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How Indigenous Kayactivists Protest Against Shell

The Lummi Youth Canoe leads kayaktivists to shores the Duwamish people used to inhabit for thousands of years. ALEX GARLAND

May 19, 2015, www.popularresistance.org | “Saturday’s action against the towering Arctic drilling rig now squatting in the port’s Terminal 5—originally Duwamish waters—was different, for lots of reasons.  It began early in the morning at the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center, where Duwamish chairwoman and elder Cecile Hansen prepped starchy biscuit mix to feed more than 50 mouths for the protest, her glasses soon flecked with flour. Native leaders and participants had traveled from all over to lead kayaktivists in native canoes that day, some coming in from Alaska. And Hansen, who can’t be much more than five feet tall, has been fighting for federal recognition of the Duwamish people for much of her life.”

Kevin Phillips shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
Greenpeace USA
www.periscope.tv
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Region’s Tribal Leaders Gather In Seattle To Fight Coal Terminal

JoDe Goudy, chairman of the Yakama Nation, calls on the Federal Government to deny permits for the Gateway Pacific Coal Terminal at a gathering of tribal leaders from around the Northwest, British Columbia and Montana. May 14, 2015, www.opb.org | “Native American leaders gathered Thursday in Seattle to draw attention to the ongoing battle between tribes from British Columbia and around the Northwest, and the companies that want to export coal and oil to Asia.  Leaders from the Lummi, Spokane, Quinault, Yakama, Tulalip, Northern Cheyenne, Swinomish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nation of British Columbia gathered at the Ballard Locks in Seattle to call on the Army Corps of Engineers to deny permits for the Gateway Pacific Terminal, which could be built near the Canadian border.”

Tribal leaders from British Columbia, Montana and all over Washington state gathered in Seattle Thursday to demand that the federal government deny permits for the largest coal export terminal in the U.S.
opb.org|By Ashley Ahearn
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The Color of Victory is not Always Clear

Robert Brothers shared a photo to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.

THE_COLOR_OF_VICTORY_IS_NOT_ALWAYS_CLEAR
Floods clean rivers like fires clean forests. The tan silt that you see in this photo mixing with clear blue water of a tributary is the Trinity River doing its job of washing silt out of the river’s salmon spawning gravels — the result of an artificial flood mandated by a court victory of the Hoopa Valley and Yurok Tribes in 2004, enforcing 20-year old legislation by the U.S. Congress.
On May 5th, releases from the Lewiston dam were increased from 500 to 8,500 cfs and will not return to 500 cfs until the end of June.
Major floods in the Trinity River were reduced by the Lewiston Dam in 1964, and 90% of the river’s flow was diverted to irrigate farms in the Central Valley. The result was an 85 percent drop in salmon, a prime food source for native peoples.
In 2000 the tribes negotiated a plan with federal and state agencies to help restore the Trinity River fishery by reducing the amount of water diverted to 50 percent. Normal flows are restored to the river by the current release, mimicking spring flooding, and by releases during the summer to keep water temperature cool enough to support salmon survival.
This is a long, complex, and on-going story of a battle to keep a river alive.
The tributary shown here is the South Fork of the Trinity River. A victim of corporatel clearcutting on highly erosive soils, the South Fork usually shows noticeably more sediment than the mainstem. It is only clear in this photo because of the lack of recent rain. For a larger view of the confluence at this time, see https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204406210655599&set=a.1052779839997.2009051.1240817813&type=1&theater
Robert Brothers's photo.

THE_COLOR_OF_VICTORY_IS_NOT_ALWAYS_CLEAR
Floods clean rivers like fires clean forests. The tan silt that you see in this photo mixing with clear blue water of a tributary is the Trinity River doing its job of washing silt out of the river’s salmon spawning gravels — the result of an artificial flood mandated by a court victory of the Hoopa Valley and Yurok Tribes in 2004, enforcing 20-year old legislation by the U.S. Congress.
On May 5th, releases from the Lewiston dam were increased from 500 to 8,500 cfs and will not return to 500 cfs until the end of June.
Major floods in the Trinity River were reduced by the Lewiston Dam in 1964, and 90% of the river’s flow was diverted to irrigate farms in the Central Valley. The result was an 85 percent drop in salmon, a prime food source for native peoples.
In 2000 the tribes negotiated a plan with federal and state agencies to help restore the Trinity River fishery by reducing the amount of water diverted to 50 percent. Normal flows are restored to the river by the current release, mimicking spring flooding, and by releases during the summer to keep water temperature cool enough to support salmon survival.
This is a long, complex, and on-going story of a battle to keep a river alive.
The tributary shown here is the South Fork of the Trinity River. A victim of corporatel clearcutting on highly erosive soils, the South Fork usually shows noticeably more sediment than the mainstem. It is only clear in this photo because of the lack of recent rain. For a larger view of the confluence at this time, see https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10204406210655599&set=a.1052779839997.2009051.1240817813&type=1&theater

Oglala Sioux Tribe victory in uranium case

May 8, 2015, www.indianz.com | “Native American and other opponents of uranium mining and milling in the southern Black Hills claimed victory April 30, when a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) oversight panel ruled in their favor on the controversial licensing of an in situ operation here.”

 

Kevin Phillips shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
Native American and other opponents of uranium mining and milling in the southern Black Hills claimed victory when a Nuclear Regulatory Commission oversight…
indianz.com

South Dakota tribes form alliance to battle Keystone XL plan

May 6, 2015, www.indianz.com | “South Dakota tribes are working with non-Indians in an effort to stop the controversial Keystone XL Pipeline from crossing their state. TransCanada, the company behind the project, received a conditional permit from the South Dakota Public Utilities Commission in February 2010. But since construction did not begin within four years, the 313-mile route must be re-certified.”

Kevin Phillips shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth‘s Timeline.
The company behind the project is seeking re-certification of the 313-mile route through the state.
indianz.com

Young Diné Walk Another 350 Miles in Prayer for People, Land, Culture

May 6, 2015, indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com | “On Earth Day the young Nihigaal Bee Iiná walkers completed the second leg of their journey, which was about 350 miles and lasted 32 days. The prayer-in-motion culminated with roughly 30 community members scaling Dooko’osliid (San Francisco Peaks), the western sacred mountain of the Diné (Navajo). Organizers of the Nihigaal Bee Iiná movement—translated as “Our Journey for Existence”—plan to walk a total of 1,000 miles this year in the name of their people, their land, their language and their culture.”

Robert Brothers shared a link to GoodNews FortheEarth’s Timeline.
On Earth Day the young Nihigaal Bee Iiná walkers completed the second leg of their journey, which was about 350 miles and lasted 32 days.
indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com
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