SF bans water bottles

March 11, 2014, www.sfbg.com | “San Francisco continues to lead the way in the nation’s environmental policy, with the Board of Supervisors on March 4 voting unanimously to bar the city from buying plastic water bottles and to ban distribution of plastic water bottles smaller than 21 ounces on city property starting Oct. 1. The ban excludes city marathons and other sporting events.”

“It’s official! First plastic bags, now plastic bottled water. After several quick votes by the Board of Supervisors and the mayor, San Francisco has become the world’s first major city to ban single-use bottled water on public property and …”
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In San Francisco, Plastic Bottles Going the Way of Plastic Bags

In San Francisco, Plastic Bottles Go the Way of Plastic Bags with City BanMarch 7, 2014, www.takepart.com | “Bottled water is no longer welcome in San Francisco.  The City by the Bay earlier this week scored yet another environmental first when legislators there unanimously voted to end the sale and distribution of plastic bottled water on municipal property—a move that will bring the city nearer its goal of diverting all its waste from landfill or incineration by 2020.”

“Good News for San Francisco!
In San Francisco, Plastic Bottles Going the Way of Plastic Bags
www.takepart.com
City ban on world’s most unnecessary item goes into effect later this year.”

San Francisco Plans on Banning Plastic Water Bottles

March 6, 2014, gizmodo.com | “San Francisco wants to cut its landfill waste down to absolute zero by 2020. While a city-wide plastic bag ban has been in effect for a few years, new legislation approved by the Board of Supervisors this week sets its sights on the bane of tap-water enthusiasts and thirsty environmentalists alike: Bay Area, say goodbye to the plastic water bottle.”

San Francisco Plans on Banning Plastic Water Bottles
gizmodo.com
San Francisco wants to cut its landfill waste down to absolute zero by 2020. While a city-wide plastic bag ban has been in effect for a few years, new legislation approved by the Board of Supervisors this…”

W.R. Grace Pays Over $63 Million Toward Cleanup and Restoration of Hazardous Waste Sites in Communities Across the Country

February 5, 2014, yosemite.epa.gov | “Today, Columbia, Md.-based W.R. Grace & Co. under its bankruptcy plan of reorganization, paid over $63 million to the U.S. government to resolve claims for environmental cleanups at approximately 39 sites in 21 states, the U.S. Department of Justice and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today.”

Robert Brothers shared a link.
If We Don’t Stop Using Poison, then We Have to Sue the Poisoners to Make them Pay for the Government to Clean Up the Mess.
W.R. Grace Corp. Forced to Pay Over $63 Million Toward Cleanup and Restoration of Hazardous Waste…
yosemite.epa.gov
Release Date: 02/05/2014Contact Information: Julia P. Valentine (News Media Only), valentine.julia@epa.gov, 202-564-0496, 202-564-4355
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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Successfully Removes Shipwrecks that were Destroying Coral Reefs in the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument; Marine Conservation Institute Helped Secure Funding for the Project

January 31, 2014, www.enn.com | “On January 16, 2014, a 16-person crew completed the removal of three sunken wrecks that plagued the coral reefs of the Pacific Remote Island Marine National Monument for over a decade. Nearly one million pounds of iron and other material were removed from the wreckage sites at Kingman Reef and Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuges inside the Marine National Monument in a 79-day operation.

The mess is gradually being cleaned up, step by step.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Successfully Removes Shipwrecks that were Destroying Coral…
www.enn.com
ENN.com: Environmental News Network — Know Your Environment
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Waste Facility to Triple the Amount of Trash Recycled

January 15, 2014, www.enn.com | “A new plant in Glendale, Arizona promises to triple the amount of trash the city recycles each year when it begins operations in April. The facility, which is being built by Chicago-based company, Vieste, will be located on 6 acres of Glendale’s landfill, just a few miles west of the University of Phoenix stadium.”

Step-by-step, small local actions gradually add up to a major change.
Glendale, Arizona: Waste Facility to Triple the Amount of Trash Recycled
www.enn.com
ENN.com: Environmental News Network — Know Your Environment

How Vancouver, B.C. became North America’s smart-growth leader

Janaury 20, 2014, www.hcn.org | “Vancouver, B.C., is North America’s uncontested smart-growth leader: Among Northwestern cities, it has the greatest population density; the highest rates of cycling, walking and transit riding; and the fewest cars per capita. Its more than 2.3 million people have the highest life expectancy and the lowest teen birth and poverty rates. Ninety percent of Vancouver’s power is hydroelectric, and the city regularly uses wind and solar. The extensive mass transit system includes high-capacity diesel buses, electric trolleys, light rail and an elevated train service. There are hundreds of miles of bike trails. As a result, Vancouver has the lowest per capita carbon emissions of any major city in the Western Hemisphere.”

Robert Brothers shared a link

How Vancouver, B.C. became North America’s smart-growth leader
www.hcn.org
It wasn’t visionary city officials; it was a movement to save the city’s ethnic Chinese neighborhoods in the ’60s.
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The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors prepares a draft to ban plastic bags

Good news! The Humboldt County Board of Supervisors voted to direct staff to prepare a draft plastic bag ban ordinance. There was great support and little controversy.

The board discussed a bit the challenges of packing meat and/or vegetables and bulk products and it is expected that staff will take these challenges into consideration as they draft the ordinance.

Chuck Schager, Eel River Disposal and Resource Recovery, explained the challenges associated with recycling plastic bags, noting that the lower quality plastic film (dark, colored plastics) have been nearly impossible to recycle for several months and that there are approximately 67 tons of this type of plastic sitting on the floor in Fortuna waiting to move.

I commented briefly and let them know that in little more than 24 hours we gathered more than 90 (!!!) signatures from the public encouraging them to move in this direction. I let them know the people were behind them as they work to ban plastic bags.

Be sure to thank your supervisor for their vote! And a special thanks to Supervisor Fennell for making the motion and to Supervisor Lovelace for the second.

I will let you all know when the draft ordinance is available for review and continue to follow this issue.

And, don’t forget: you can ban plastic bags in your life at any time simply by not accepting them at stores! Your actions will have an impact.

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Lowell turns former landfill into lucrative solar venture

An aerial view of the 6,000 solar panels at the former landfill off Westford Street in Lowell. The panels are expected to help the city save $1.5 million

January 6, 2014, www.lowellsun.com | “Solar panels atop the former landfill off Westford Street have begun producing energy for the city, making productive use out of an eyesore, saving money for Lowell, and avoiding the use of greenhouse-gas-producing energy.”.

Solar panels are helping the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, save $2.5 million every year –> http://sc.org/MAsolarLandfill
Photo: Solar panels are helping the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, save $2.5 million every year --> http://sc.org/MAsolarLandfill
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Conservation Group Turns Christmas Trees Into Salmon Habitat

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December 27, 2013, earthfix.opb.org | “Before you kick your dying Christmas tree to the curb, consider this: Members of the conservation group Trout Unlimited would love to turn that tree into fish habitat.”

Connie Ashby shared a link. conservation Group Turns Christmas Trees Into Salmon Habitat · EarthFix · Oregon Public Broadcasting earthfix.opb.org. Before you kick your dying Christmas tree to the curb, consider this: Members of the conservation group Trout Unlimited would love to turn that tree into fish habitat.

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